Too much on your plate?

Inclarity understands that technology belongs to you, not the other way around. Today’s communications are an endless stream of emails, instant messages, texts, calls, and if you liaise with people from varying timezones, there’s not even a sense of a working day from which to ‘clock off’. When your work is in the cloud, the cloud goes with you – from the office to your home, from your car to a waiting room, first thing in the morning and last thing at night. So it’s up to you not to over do it. It’s up to you to select a balanced diet of when you are available and unavailable.

“The negative impacts of this ‘always on’ culture are that your mind is never resting, you’re not giving your body time to recover, so you’re always stressed,” says Dr Christine Grant, an occupational psychologist at Coventry University’s Centre for Research in Psychology, Behaviour and Achievement.

“And the more tired and stressed we get, the more mistakes we make. Physical and mental health can suffer.”

A bad carpenter always blames his tools.

The advent of hosted VoIP telephony and smart devices sets us free – great tools for us to use to our advantage. Creating boundaries creates a healthier mind, putting you in control, and managing your time and energy so that your brain isn’t always on a treadmill. To return to the buffet analogy – just because all of the food is in front of you doesn’t mean you can’t balance or pace your diet and merely take what you need.

This digital willpower is directly related to product excellence – increasingly the true measure of hard work and the manifestation of the maxim ‘work smarter, not harder’.

We decide the perimeters. Leaders at work should provide the necessary technology in order that their staff can work smarter and not necessarily longer hours. They should reassure staff that ‘switching off’ is part of a necessary path to product excellence, along with taking regular breaks from the screen.

I am the law

In other words, you call the shots. It’s up to you to develop the self-discipline and skills to manage digital communications efficiently and on your own terms. A culture of ‘self-regulation’ will soon be the norm. Possessing the ability to establish digital boundaries is fast becoming an expected workplace competency, along with PC literacy and communication skills.